Fund A Micro-Community Project

We pursue initiatives and programs that will make a lasting impact within our micro-community model. It is our aim that by sharing our projects of focus at a given time, supporters may come across specific giving opportunities that are self-sustaining and meaningful. We stand by our 100% promise that one hundred percent of your gift will go right where it should.

SOLAR LANTERN INITIATIVE

Woman with lantern

One fifth of the world population still relies on oil lamps and candles for lighting given the unrealistic cost to connect to the grid. Thirty-eight billion dollars is spent annually to fuel kerosene lamps which only fill cramped homes with dim light and dirty fumes. Mothers, most often widows, walk miles each day just to charge their cell phones since most business transactions occur via mobile credit. Hours spent walking and poor lighting means less time working and less income.

To address the lack of access to electricity in the rural areas surrounding our micro-communities, Horizon Initiative has developed a community outreach initiative to distribute solar-powered LED lanterns to neighboring families as an off-grid solution. Not only do these innovative solar kits provide bright, long-lasting light, they are also equipped with adapters to charge cell phones. These simple provisions empower women and their families with opportunity that multiplies, giving mothers light by which to work, children light by which to study, clean air for a healthier home, kerosene savings, and increased safety. Horizon has distributed nearly 500 lanterns to households across Western Kenya, with plans to provide 1000 more.

Just $50 (USD) provides a family with a solar kit and helps us to grow this community outreach initiative. To fund a solar kit and light up a Kenyan home, click below.





RESOURCES

Solar Lantern Initiative PDF (Download)
Horizon’s Solar Lantern Beneficiaries
New York Times Article: African Huts Far From The Grid Glow With Renewable Power
WSJ Video Feature
Photojournalist Peter DiCampo’s Life Without Lights